Fleetwood Mac Live: It’s Almost Too Much

Fleetwood Mac, Atlanta, Philips Arena

Sweetness… Stevie Nicks tweeted this from an earlier show, welcoming Christine McVie back to Fleetwood Mac.

Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks were concluding a stripped-down opening of “Tusk” last night when John McVie and Mick Fleetwood segued in with that wicked bass and drum part.

And I fell back into my chair at Philips Arena, feeling drunk  from another of the countless moments of musical bliss during Fleetwood Mac’s concert.

“It’s almost too much,” I said out loud but to no one.

They were that good. They played only old stuff, a lot of the hits and a few chestnuts for us diehards. And yet this wasn’t just about nostalgia, a cruise-ship oldies show. The four of them, along with returning songbird Christine McVie, are all around 70 – but they rocked it out. Buckingham remains a fierce lead guitarist. The harmonies were tighter than in their ‘70s heyday. And they all were clearly enjoying each other and their ongoing popularity.

Fans like me grew up with this band and know their personal stories as intimately as their music. Combine that sweetness with the blazing musicality of the show, and we had a spectacular evening that only a handful of other acts can deliver. You can’t separate their soap opera from the songs. It’s one of the great sagas in pop music history.

Here are some pictures from last night (yes, Stevie and Lindsey are still gorgeous – and truly, sincerely weird).

A few more thoughts:

  • Welcome back, Christine McVie. Lovely, lovely, lovely.
  • Lindsey’s a bigger drama queen than Stevie.
  • John McVie carries an orchestra in his bass.
  • Stevie and Mick need to spike that post-“Songbird” speechifying. But restraint from excess has never been Fleetwood Mac’s forte, of course.
  • Mick Fleetwood in particular is an inspiration, still deliriously in love with playing the drums.
  • And if all the goodwill on stage didn’t warm your heart for more than 2 hours, hearing them all sing “Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow” still can.

19 Examples of the Worst Jargon of 2014

jargonHere’s a lesson from the first day of the first writing class anyone ever took: Write to express, not to impress.

That should be simple enough to remember. But too often, we churn our way through clichés, jargon and other stale expressions that indicate we’re not interested in expressing ourselves – we’re just moving our lips or striking the keys.

Relying on jargon, acronyms and the like isn’t just annoying and lazy. It’s bad for business because it says: I do not care if you understand.

Jargon, Buzz words, Atlanta, Business, Corporate communications, language, clarity, stop saying these stupid thingsIt’s always good, easy fun to list ridiculous and overused words, non-words, phrases and gibberish that find their way into everyday discourse. Seems like most of it’s in business, doesn’t it? Corporate-speak can really kill English the most.

I’ve put together a list here of some of the Worst Jargon of 2014. I’m including a few examples that aren’t jargon exactly but remain crimes against the language. Thanks to friends and colleagues who contributed.

1. Learnings. An example: “John is back from his conference and will share some of his top learnings with us.”

2. Stakeholdering. I’m not sure, but I think it’s supposed to mean “relationship building,” or something like that.

3. Conceptualize. Have you used the Business Buzzword Generator? Try it now. It’s a hoot.

4. Skilling. This takes the “learning” example to the next depth. “The team will need some skilling on how to use the new processes.”

Mrs. Jones is the lady on Hudson Street... because a noun is a person, place or thing.

Mrs. Jones is the lady on Hudson Street… because a noun is a person, place or thing.

5. Ask. Here’s perhaps the worst, and perhaps most common, example of using a verb as a noun for no reason at all, except that you heard your boss doing it. Example: “When you go to the budget meeting, what will your main ask be?”

6. Choiceful. “When we’re making those decisions, we have to be really choiceful.”… I have no idea why anyone would ever say that, but people do it every day in Corporate America. See also: impactful.

7. Solution – as a verb. I’m not kidding. “We have a real challenge here, but we also know how we’re going to solution that.” Also: “update.”

8. Eventize. From a friend in Hollywood. An example: “We’re eventizing our entertainment slate.” Translation: We are airing this new show and it’s so incredibly hot that it’s going to be a big event, not just a regular TV show.

9. Utilize. Because “use” was out of town?

10. At the end of the day. Unless you’re in “Les Miz,” never.

11. Iconic. We used to call old movie stars “legendary.” Now, somehow, anyone of any note must be referred to as “iconic.” Stop, please.

Uhm... like, totally!

Uhm… like, totally!

12. Uh… and Uhm… Have these replaced “like” and “ya know” in conversation or business meetings and presentations?

13. Obviously – when it’s not obvious at all. If it is obvious, you probably don’t need to say so.

14. Ideate. “We should spend a little more time with the ideation on this…”  (Translation:  We still need to work on this, and some of that work will require creative thought.)

15. Swirl: “Our intent is to minimize the swirl on this one…”  (Translation: How do we keep the fewest number of people involved in this decision?)

16. Swimlanes: “We need to make sure everyone is clear on their swimlane and stays within it.”  (Translation:  Everyone needs to do what they are supposed to do and not spend time doing other people’s stuff.)

17. Hashtag. Use a hashtag, but stop saying it. With air quotes.

18. Mindshare. An editor friend sent that one. I have no idea.

19. Maximizer. Sounds naughty.

And here’s a fun piece with more examples on CNN.com. Oy!

Share your own examples. I wish I could incentivize you…

Santa Speedo Run is Playful Fun for a Good Cause

Atlanta, Santa Speedo Run, Midtown, Peachtree, Baton Bob, Everybody Wins, Children's literacy, literacy, charity event, gay, gay men,

Go, Santa.

Apologies to friends in Boston and other cold cities that have similar annual events, but today was beautiful and balmy for the Atlanta Santa Speedo Run.

The event is a fund-raiser for a different organization each year. This time, the money will go to Everybody Wins, a children’s literacy group. The goal was $70,000. I’m guessing the runners raised more, given the rockin’ turnout and the gorgeous weather. (Donate and check for updates here.)

It followed Sunday’s Toy Party, another charity event for kids supported primarily by Atlanta’s gay community.

I was expecting hunks in trunks, and there were plenty. But women and straight guys joined the group of mostly gay men. And there were non-running supporters, a brass band in goofy hats, and Atlanta police helping with traffic on the fun run’s 1.5 mile route on sunny Peachtree Street in Midtown.

When I checked the temp on my iPhone, it was 61.

Sorry, Boston.

(Click on a pic to make it bigger. Rollover to see the caption.)

32 years Ago Today – Breslin on Deadline

Originally posted on The City Room:

The night of December 8th, Jimmy Breslin was at home when he got the call that John Lennon had been shot. This is the column he wrote on deadline.

ARE YOU JOHN LENNON?

That summer in Breezy Point, when he was eighteen and out of Madison High in Brooklyn, there was the Beatles on the radio at the beach through the hot days and on the jukebox through the nights in the Sugar Bowl and Kennedys. He was young and he let his hair grow and there were girls and it was the important part of life.

Last year, Tony Palma even went to see Beatlemania.

And now, last night, a thirty-four-year-old man, he sat in a patrol car at Eighty-second Street and Columbus Avenue and the call came over the radio: “Man shot, One West Seventy-second Street.”

Palma and his partner, Herb Frauenberger, rushed through the Manhattan streets to…

View original 546 more words

Celebrating a Beloved Bookstore’s 25 Years

“We don’t want bookstores to die. Authors need them, and so do neighborhoods.” — Roy Blount, Jr.

A Capella Books, Atlanta, bookstore, independent, Little Five Points, Inman Park, bookshop, books, out of print books, hard to find books, 25th anniversary, 25 years,

From Kurt Cobain to Flaubert… and lots more.

Like newspapers and the music business, bookstores everywhere have taken an evolutionary hit in the digital age. Many have folded up, including all the Borders chain and Atlanta’s Outwrite.

But A Cappella Books continues to give bibliophiles reason to hope — and to spend money. On Friday, the independent shop celebrated 25 years in business with a reception at The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and a party afterward at Manuel’s Tavern.

It was also a launch of a new book about the shop, featuring some of the city’s top writers, called “A Cozy Infinity.”

‘I Like Seeing the Good Guys Win’

A Capella Books, Atlanta, bookstore, independent, Jimmy Carter, Manuel's Tavern, Inman Park, Little Five Points

Owner Frank Reiss

Throughout the years and changing marketplace, owner Frank Reiss has moved the store to a few locations in the Little Five Points/Inman Park area. He’s adapted nimbly from his original focus on hard-to-find and out-of-print books. Now he has added more online sales, more events with authors, and selling more signed copies.

The first two locations were in the heart of Little Five Points, with heavy foot traffic and lots of stores and restaurants around. Now, he’s in a more isolated spot nearby that’s right up against busy DeKalb Avenue.

“This isn’t the story that everybody thinks of, this romantic haven for reading,” he says. “It is in a way. But it’s been a hustle, a lot of strategic business decisions to survive and do OK. So that’s what the story really is.”

Reiss has built the kind of goodwill that local merchants dream of.

A Capella Books, Atlanta, bookstore, independent, Little Five Points, Inman Park, bookshop, books, out of print books, hard to find books, 25th anniversary, 25 years,

A clean, well-lighted place for books…

“It was a great pleasure to pay tribute to one of the world’s nicest people who, as a bookseller, also happens to be raising the knowledge/intelligence/enlightenment quotient of the greater Atlanta region,” said Hank Klibanoff, a former Atlanta Journal-Constitution managing editor and contributor to the book. “From some great authors, you could feel the enormous rush of love for Frank and his support for their work. It was one of those start-to-finish feel good evenings.”

And from a fan on Facebook, Noel Mayeske: “I like seeing the good guys win.  Great job Frank on building a book store Atlanta loves, and enduring through some very changing times over 25 years. Here’s to many more!”

And it’s not just anybody who can score a presidential library and Manuel’s on the same night.

Let Him Tell His Own Story

I could write a recap of the store’s history. But this is really good, from the store’s website:

When A Cappella Books first opened its doors in Little Five Points in 1989, there was no Amazon. For all intents and purposes there was no internet. Barnes & Noble had not even arrived in Atlanta. Oxford Books dominated the local retail book landscape, with another newcomer, Chapter 11, nipping at its heels. Only a few years later, Oxford had succumbed to its newfangled competition. In several more years, Chapter 11 was bankrupt.

A Capella Books, A Cozy Infinit, Atlanta, Inman Park, Little Five Points, Independents bookstore, books, Frank Reiss, Jimmy Carter, Manuel's Tavern

25 Years, 25 Writers

A quarter century–and three re-locations–later, A Cappella is still going strong, and, while still hardly bigger physically than its original incarnation, the little store plays a big role in the local literary scene, presenting important authors and selling books at venues all over town.

To celebrate its longevity, A Cappella is publishing a book: A Cozy Infinity: 25 (Mostly) Atlanta Writers on the Never-Ending Allure of Books and Bookstores. Contributors to the volume include Pulitzer Prize-winner Hank Klibanoff, former Atlanta Magazine editor Rebecca Burns, James Beard award-winning food writer John T. Edge, popular columnist Hollis Gillespie and celebrated local novelists Thomas MullenSusan Rebecca WhiteAnthony Grooms, and Joseph Skibell. The book’s title comes from one of the 25 essays contained in it, penned by Esquire staff writer and Atlanta resident Tom Junod

Reiss ended up writing more of “A Cozy Infinity” than he had planned.

“It’s where I tell the story of how I got into the book business and started the bookstore here in Atlanta and figured out a way to keep doing it for 25 years,” he said.

Smaller Stores Are Doing Better

The American Booksellers Association, which represents independent bookstores, says its membership grew 6.4 percent in 2013, to 2,022. Sales were up 8 percent in 2012, and those gains held last year, The Washington Post reported in an article citing a resurgence of independents.

“There’s a lot of room for improvement, but not everything is doom and gloom for America’s bookstores,” reported The Open Education Database.

In 2013, Publisher’s Weekly ranked Georgia as 18th among states for book sales. The state had 252 independent bookstores.

Others that have made the most of their niche include Charis Books & More in Little Five Points, with a focus on women, and Little Shop of Stories in Decatur, which sells children’s books.

Let me know about others, and share your stories and support for A Cappella and other independent bookstores. At this time of year, when we’re all out there shopping, it’s good to keep local independent merchants of all kinds in mind.

(Click on a photo to see it bigger. Mouse over for captions.)

A Cappella Books, 208 Haralson Ave. N.E., 404-681-5128, Sunday noon to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. acapellabooks.com

 

3 Easy Tips from the Pros for Taking Better Photos with Your Phone

If everyone’s a writer in the Internet age, then it’s doubly true that everyone’s a photographer.

We all take a lot of pictures, mostly on our phones. It’s fun, it’s easy and — unlike in the prehistoric days when we had to develop film — it’s a source of cheap and instant gratification.

But are you doing it right?

If you’re like me, you might not even notice that sometimes you’re taking pictures that will show telephone poles growing out of someone’s head … or you might look at the photo later and say, It really wasn’t that dark in there.

I’m no expert. But I’ve had the privilege of working with great professional photographers and designers over the years. And they’ve been kind enough to share pointers that are so basic and simple, even I have benefitted from using them.

So try these out next time you’re taking selfies or shots of the family, the dogs or even landscapes.

And shoot a LOT. It’s digital!

1. The Rule of Thirds. You know how Instagram puts a tic-tac-toe board over your screen? It’s to help you compose the image so that the subject is where it should be. And most of the time, it’s at one of the four intersection points. Use this with any camera, any time. Just divide the screen into thirds horizontally and thirds vertically, and put the main subject at one of the points where the lines cross.

2. Look at the entire screen. What is behind the subject and what’s filling the rest of the image area? If you’re taking a photo of mom in the living room, is there a giant floral arrangement behind her that will make her look like an alien peacock? Is the wallpaper so loud it competes with her Christmas sweater?

3. It’s all about the lighting. Be sure to touch the screen on the main subject — mom’s face, for instance — so your phone or camera adjusts to light her. Be careful of putting people in front of windows or other bright light — it can make them appear so dark that you can’t see them in the photo.

THE BAD (mine)

photography tips, iPhone, how to take better photos, Georgia Tech, GA Tech, undergraduates, North Avenue, Atlanta

What’s wrong with this picture? A lot! (I can say that because I took it.) My friend Pete Cross, who is a sensational photographer, pointed out that I have a telephone pole growing out of one of the guy’s heads AND a ‘Do Not Enter’ sign on his ear. Also, the shadows are unfortunate. I could’ve just moved around them a bit to get a better shot.

THE GOOD (a pro’s)

Ben Gray, photos, photography, iphone photos, how to take better pictures, Atlanta, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Ben Gray liked the image of nature overcoming the sign, and he added to it by following the Rule of Thirds down the right side. He also waited for a little action in the background. Ben says adding a little activity, or something different in another plane, adds to the shot.

MORE BEN GRAY:  His #runography project

RELATED: ‘Everybody Writes,’ indeed

RELATED: Photos from Krog Street Market

When the Photographer Started Running, What Did He Get? #Runography, of Course

We all long for a career doing something we love.

Ben Gray, Atlanta, Journal-Constitution, AJC, running, runner, ultra distance, ultra-marathon, marathon, people who run crazy distances, instagram, runography, belt line

He carries a little tripod for the occasional selfie.

Some of us find passion in a hobby.

Ben Gray has both – and a way to combine them in a new creative project on social media.

Five days a week, Ben, 43, wraps his iPhone in a plastic baggie and tucks it into the inside-waistband pocket of his running shorts. Then Ben – an award-winning photojournalist and ultra-marathon runner — hits the streets, trails and backroads of Atlanta for runs that can last several hours.

Along the way, when he spots something that would make a good photo, he stops, takes out the iPhone, gets a quick shot – and uploads it to his Instagram account with the #runography hashtag.

Ben Gray, Atlanta, Journal-Constitution, AJC, running, runner, ultra distance, ultra-marathon, marathon, people who run crazy distances, instagram, runographyThen he keeps on running.

Ben estimates he’ll log 2,000 miles this year. He’s burned 163,000 calories so far in 2014. This year, he ran his first 100-mile race. And he only started four years ago (not counting high school track).

At age 39, Ben had covered the Peachtree Road Race for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for many years. He always thought it looked like fun, so he decided to start training for the 10K.

“I hated it when I started,” he says now. “The turning point was when I could go a distance and actually get somewhere. I could find different routes and check out different neighborhoods.”

Soon he was running from the AJC’s Dunwoody office to the Lindbergh MARTA station. His wife and two kids would drive from their Southwest Atlanta home to their Decatur church 11 miles away, and he’d meet them there on foot.

The Peachtree led to his first marathon, then first 50K, 50-miler, 100K and onward.

That takes a lot of training, but a photographer’s eyes are never blind to what he’s passing. The iPhone is easy to carry and Ben likes the constraints of it and posting the shots immediately. No fuss, no filters, no slowing the heart rate — and no treating it like an assignment for work.

He’s growing a following on Instagram and considering ways to take #runography to another level.

“It’s really about what I like and what I’m seeing,” he says. “And hopefully, other people like it, too.”

Follow Ben on Instagram 

Click here for 3 easy tips for better pics


RELATED: The Run Commuter gets to work on foot

RELATED: Ex-photojournalist starts ‘Plan B’

Braves Fans Respond to Heyward Trade on Twitter: Say-Hey It Ain’t So

Jason Heyward, Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, traded, outfielder, baseball, major league baseball

Say goodbye, J-Hey…

Why is it that nothing breaks your heart like baseball?

I’m so disappointed by today’s news that the Braves traded Jason Heyward. I’m a longtime fan of the game and the team, and I was hoping to watch this kid grow up before our eyes and spend his career at Turner Field –

Oops! … Make that, somewhere in metro Atlanta.

Is that too much to ask? To see a talented, likable young player spend his career with the same team? Or at least much of it?

Jason Heyward, Atlanta Braves, trade, baseball , T-shirt, fan, 22, St. Louis Cardinals,

I’m keeping it.

Am I being romantic? Thinking the game is more important than the business? Of course. It’s baseball!

But I’m no expert, and I don’t enjoy following the ins-and-outs of trades and negotiations and free agency, and why the BJ Upton deal ruined everything that Dan Uggla didn’t destroy.

I just know that I’m one step closer to bailing on the Braves completely. After the terrible season. After Uggla. After COBB COUNTY… And you can’t tell me that of all the crappy things about this team, that Jason Heyward was the one that needed to go. You just can’t.

La Stella was an exciting anti-Uggla — so, of course, he’s gone, too.  At least we still have Freeman, Gattis, Chris Johnson, for now… But still, J-Hey was special. And he said he didn’t want to go.

On Twitter, fans who are more informed, funnier and angrier are offering better commentary. Here are some samples.

And Braves, seriously: I might be done with you.

The Braves just traded Jason Heyward to the Cardinals. So uh, that’s it for me and baseball

Atlanta Braves, after milking Cobb County taxpayers for hundreds of millions, trade Jason Heyward before his payday:

Jason Heyward: I want to thank the fans in Braves nation. I gave it 100% for them.

As if  fans weren’t already excited about , here are five more reasons to be stoked: 

“This deal is definitely focused on the short term.” –  GM John Mozeliak:  

Thanks  for 5 years of giving your all to 

Jason Heyward‘s 1st MLB AB remains one of the coolest baseball moments of the decade. http://m.mlb.com/video/v7282459/chcatl-heyward-hits-threerun-homer-in-first-atbat

 trade Jason Heyward and John Hart just took a monumental risk. Blog: http://jeffschultz.blog.ajc.com/2014/11/17/braves-hart-takes-huge-risk-by-dealing-heyward/

 Hart’s approval rating just took a nosedive. Braves fans are 

 Better to move JHey than Jup. “Potential” never hit 25+ homers in back to back seasons.

Jason Heyward is an impact defender but has really slipped offensively. Last 2 years: 25 HR, .400 SLG. Nate Schierholtz: 28 HR, .400 SLG

. to STL.  to ATL. We have our first blockbuster.  

The Braves traded Jason Heyward to the freakin’ Cardinals? C’mon now John Hart.

why would you trade Jason Heyward PERIOD??? RT : Why would you trade Jason Hayward for pitching.

If Jason Heyward is traded because of the ridiculous  contracts given to Uggla & BJ there is no justice in this world.

RIP Jason Heyward dreams

RELATED >> Read blogger Sean Breslin’s take on this. 


MORE SPORTS: Photo tour of Atlanta’s new College Football Hall of Fame

MORE SPORTS: John Rocker on ‘Survivor’

MORE SPORTS: Fun night at the Braves game

Krog Street Market Continues Atlanta’s Intown Redevelopment Buzz — PHOTOS

Krog Street Market, one of the many intown projects to turn old industrial space into fabulous retail/restaurant developments, is coming along smashingly.

Friends had a great dinner Friday at The Luminary, where the bar staff says they’ve been packing in diners for a couple of months. John Tarrant told me Saturday that he and his wife, Cindy, hope to open French Market Flowers next week. Folks at Little Tart coffee and bakeshop said the same thing.

Krog Street Market is next to the BeltLine and not far from Ponce City Market. From the engaging and informative website:

Krog Street market is a destination for Atlanta’s intown culture – those who are always searching for unique, specialty creations. It’s designed to be as authentic as the 1920’s warehouse it’s built into. With market stalls to sell produce, goods, and prepared food, along with a few southern-grown restaurants and retailers, the market will offer Atlantans a gathering place of sorts – a locale for taking in an extraordinary meal or picking up a few inspiring ingredients – a west coast-style market, right in the heart of Inman Park.

I enjoyed a quick walk-through Saturday, where renovations are concluding, and I look forward to Krog Street Market’s success. It’s another exciting addition to the neighborhood. And now I won’t have to drive so far for my Jeni’s Ice Cream fix.


 

RELATED: Some favorite local blogs

RELATED: He lost his job, then became The King of Pops

RELATED: A second career on ‘The Walking Dead’

Chicken Wing Ice Cream? Bacon Dental Floss? 7 Flavor Experiments to Make You Go ‘Ick’ – Or Not

As families gather for their holiday feasts across the country, millions of Americans will look forward in particular to one enduring favorite side dish: the green bean casserole.

campbells_green-bean-casserole_s4x3_lgIt’s a staple, after all.

But it wasn’t always so. In fact, it was invented by a Campbell’s employee, one Dorcas Reilly, some 60 years ago.

Hard to believe, but canned soup, fried onion bits and green beans weren’t always a natural go-to combo. Now the dish sells millions of dollars in condensed mushroom goo every fourth quarter.

It’s in the spirit of Campbell’s immortal La Reilly, then, that we aren’t sure whether to chuckle, cringe or take a bite when we see things like these seven flavor experiments. Some are new, some are just new to us, and some are sure to be gone by the holiday season next year.

Or not.

With commentary from friends who are chefs, food writers or both, most of them offered during a lively group discussion on Facebook:

Cappuccino-Potato-Chips1. Cappuccino Potato Chips, from Lay’s, which also test-marketed Cheddar Bacon Mac & Cheese, Mango Salsa and Wasabi Ginger this year.

Reports Jill Silva, food editor of the Kansas City Star: “I left those cappuccino chips out in the newsroom – where every dish gets wiped clean – and I was accused of trying to poison my colleagues.”

Kristen Browning-Blas, until recently the food editor of The Denver Post: “I suppose marketing people know that consumers respond to wacky new taste sensations. I think American palates are so inured to the artificial burst of sweet-salt flavors that real food doesn’t taste right to them.”

images2. Bacon dental floss. Jill also notes the growing popularity of bacon-flavored additives, including this one.

maplebaconbeer3. Carlos Frias of The Palm Beach Post posted this on Instagram: Maple Bacon Coffee Porter. From Funky Buddha, no less.

4. “Garlic ice cream is the latest craziness I’ve heard about,” says Meridith Ford, a pastry chef, former dining critic at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and currently a marketing consultant for Atlanta restaurants.

Crazy — or inspired? I think this one could work. I still dream of Hector Santiago’s avocado ice cream at his late Pura Vida. And I don’t even mind Richard Blais’s foie gras milkshake, which endures currently at his Flip Burger chain.

chicken-wing-ice-cream5. Chicken Wing Ice Cream. Here, though, we draw the line.

6. Kool-Aid Pickles, included by Susan Puckett in her book “Eat Drink Delta: A Hungry Traveler’s Journey through the Soul of the South.”

“They are a Mississippi Delta classic started years ago by kids in poor neighborhoods who would go into convenience stores after school and buy a pack of Kool-Aid, open it up and sprinkle it over a jumbo dill pickle,” Susan says.

Kool-Aid-Pickles“Then store owners saw an opportunity and started marinating them in different flavors. They are not for everyone, to say the least.

7. Frito’s Pizza at Papa John’s. Susan’s husband, Ralph Ellis of CNN, points out this one but offers no elaboration.

Sometimes, none’s needed.

HT_papa_johns_sk_141029_16x9_992

So, will any of these make it to your kitchen this year?

Send us your own crazy favorites.

Bon appetit!


RELATED: Eat your way around Atlanta’s West Midtown

RELATED: Honeysuckle Gelato coming to Ponce City Market

RELATED: The King of Pops(icles) Makes It Work